Tag Archives: CNN

Linsanity: Chink In the Armor Fallout

LinSanity ice cream, Linsanity, Jeremy Lin, race and LinsanityYes, there is a new flavor of ice cream named Taste the Lin-Sanity. Does Jeremy Lin get a cut? He should!

The frenzy that is Linsanity has yet to peak and it seems to disregard game by game results by Mr. Lin. Indeed, it’s moved into a new level such that Linsanity has a life of its own. Paramount to this is the question of race, image of Asian Americans of themselves as much as how the rest of the world perceives us, and the bastion of what was always Ebony and Ivory, the NBA. Is it weird to be in year 2012 and have a new hero much like Jackie Robinson was to the sport of baseball or Tiger Woods to golf?

Jeremy Lin is more like Jackie Robinson to me, and the hopes and dreams of Asian Americans seemed pinned to his success. What are our dreams exactly? It can be simply for a young Asian American hapa to make the NBA like my young friend Tom in 4th grade. Finally, he has a role model that he can relate to. It’s also a coolness factor. That Asian American men actually are sexy, strong, and confident despite Madison Avenue messaging that only Asian women are sex symbols.

And what do you think of Chink in the Armor? My friends, the musical group The Slants, are probably chuckling. Our world is now so PC that they — The Slants — an Asian American dance band (and very good, check them out) are denied trademark rights because they dare to denigrate themselves with racial slurs. To be honest, Chink in the Armor is a clever play on words. Very headline worthy. Catchy too. Is it too honest? That people view Lin as a Chink? Do they view him that way or was this just a headline grabber for readership? I would like to think the writer who was fired is not even racist. That’s entirely possible.

There is a whole new huge world out there that is now suddenly interested in basketball who never paused the channel before and it extends beyond the U.S.A. That Lin can engage the Asian community both here and in China is a marketer’s dream. With his squeaky clean image juxtaposed with his on court swagger, this is a new world of media images we’ve never seen before. I think it will start to extend beyond basketball. Maybe there will finally be an Asian Old Spice guy. Maybe Asian actors will be cast beyond doctors and techno geniuses.

What do you think? Did Chink in the Armor bother you or did it just bounce off your armor? Does it bother you that Linsanity is not just about his basketball ability but his race or do you accept that it’s a package deal? Do you think the hype IS caused by race? I’d love to get your opinion!

 

ESPN has swiftly fired the writer responsible for publishing a post about the Knicks Friday loss with title, “Chink In the Armor.” The headline went up at 2:30 am and ran for exactly 35 minutes before it was taken down.

ESPN released the following statement apologizing for the lapse in judgement:

Last night, ESPN.com’s mobile web site posted an offensive headline referencing Jeremy Lin at 2:30 am ET. The headline was removed at 3:05 am ET. We are conducting a complete review of our cross-platform editorial procedures and are determining appropriate disciplinary action to ensure this does not happen again. We regret and apologize for this mistake.

ESPN anchor Max Bretos has also been suspended for 30 days for asking, “If there is a chink in the armor, where can Lin improve his game?” while on the air. Whoops, shoulda just gone with a simple, “You Lin Some, You Lose Some.”

from Gawker

Some more interesting articles sent by friends. Thanks Tai, Nathalie and Tim!

Linsanity: A Marketer’s Dream from CNN

“From a marketing perspective for the Knicks, Lin’s popularity is proving a boon — last week his No.17 jersey was outselling those of LeBron James and Kobe Bryant.”

Is Linsanity Hype Caused by Race? from CNN

“Floyd Mayweather Jr., the famed boxer, caused controversy when he said the other day, ‘Jeremy Lin is a good player but all the hype is because he’s Asian. Black players do what he does every night and don’t get the same praise.'” Lin is the first Chinese-American to not just get on the court but make a major impact in the NBA. That is huge. 

Asian Harvard Grad Somehow Succeeding In New York; Or, Why I Love Jeremy Lin from DeadSpin

“Jeremy Lin, a charming 23-year-old with an economics degree from Harvard College, has somehow become the city’s ultimate underdog and talisman.”

Just Lin, Baby! 10 Lessons Jeremy Lin Can Teach Us Before We Go To Work Monday Morning from Forbes

“The Jeremy Lin story is incredibly popular because we can all see a little bit of ourselves in this man’s struggles and now successes.”

1. Believe in yourself when no one else does.

2. Seize the opportunity when it comes up.

3. Your family will always be there for you, so be there for them. 

4. Find the system that works for your style.

5. Don’t overlook talent that might exist around you today on your team.

6. People will love you for being an original, not trying to be someone else.

7. Stay humble. 

8. When you make others around you look good, they will love you forever.

9. Never forget about the importance of luck or fate in life.

10. Work your butt off.

May we all learn from Jeremy Lin and be better for it.

 

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A Racist Bake Sale at U.C. Berkeley

racist bake sale U.C. Berkeley UC Berkeley JadeLuckClub Don't identify as Asian when applying to collegeAnother racist bake sale at U. C. Berkeley. These prices are different from the one at Bucknell :

UC Berkeley: white men for $2, Asian men for $1.50, Latino men for $1, black men for 75 cents and Native American men for 25 cents. All women will get 25 cents off those prices.

Bucknell: Asians — $1.50, Whites — $1.00, Blacks/Latinos — 50 cents

There’s a lot at stake here given the new legislation pending in California. What do you think? Should racist bake sales be allowed as part of freedom of speech? And if so, what should the pricing be?

p.s. For all the posts on being Asian American and applying to college, please click here.

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(CNN) — It’s meant to be racist, and it’s meant to be discriminatory.

And the controversial “Increase Diversity Bake Sale” hosted by the Berkeley College Republicans is still on, the club’s president said, despite “grossly misguided comments” and threats aimed at supporters of the University of California, Berkeley, student group.

During the sale, scheduled for Tuesday, baked goods will be sold to white men for $2, Asian men for $1.50, Latino men for $1, black men for 75 cents and Native American men for 25 cents. All women will get 25 cents off those prices.

The bake sale is meant to draw attention to pending legislation that would allow California universities to consider race, gender, ethnicity and national origin during the admissions process.

“We agree that the event is inherently racist, but that is the point,” BCR President Shawn Lewis wrote in response to upheaval over the bake sale. “It is no more racist than giving an individual an advantage in college admissions based solely on their race (or) gender.”

Similar events have been held at other colleges across the country, generally organized by college Republican groups. In some cases — such as at Berkeley — the plan sparked controversy and protests.

Other times, university officials stepped in.

At Bucknell University in Pennsylvania, officials shut down one of the bake sales on campus. Officials at The College of William and Mary in Virginia cut off a cookie sale, saying they were “shocked and appalled.”

The University of California, Irvine, shut down a bake sale on campus, saying it was discriminatory. A bake sale at Southern Methodist University in Texas was shut down after 45 minutes because of what officials called an “unsafe environment,” according to local reports.

Lewis said the bake sale at Berkeley was unanimously agreed upon by the club, whose leadership includes Asian and Hispanic students and whose membership represents a “wide variety of ethnic backgrounds.”

“More than half of the voices were female,” he added.

Berkeley’s student government, the Associated Students of the University of California, held an emergency Senate meeting late Sunday to discuss the issue and passed a resolution that, in part, “condemns the use of discrimination whether it is in satire or in seriousness by any student group.”

“I completely support the idea of BCR — or any students on campus — (having) political discussion,” ASUC President Vishalli Loomba said. “I think student members of BCR have a full right to express their feelings, but I don’t necessarily think this tactic is constructive. I strongly encourage them to engage in this dialogue in a more constructive manner, such as a forum or a town hall meeting.’

But the bake sale is intended to be a direct, “physical counterpoint” to an ASUC-sponsored phone bank — also scheduled for Tuesday — during which students will be encouraged to call Gov. Jerry Brown’s office to support the legislation, Lewis said. The ASUC has endorsed the legislation, SB 185.

Lewis said supporters of the bake sale have received threats, including people who said they will “stop by the table only to knock it over” or “buy a cupcake just to throw it at (us).”

“Some of the threats online have gotten more specific, but we’re hoping that’s just emotion,” he said.

While the initial feedback to the planned sale was largely in heated opposition, responses have “plateaued” and include the support of self-described Democrats, Lewis said.

Loomba, the student government president, said she is concerned about students potentially feeling ostracized due to the bake sale.

“I have heard that from numerous students who have said this makes students feel unwelcome on campus,” she said. “For that reason alone, we should think about what events we have on campus.”

Loomba described the situation as a “campus climate issue.”

“UC Berkeley stands for a place where everyone — regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation — should feel inclusive,” she said. “I think they should be able to express their opinion, but keep that value in mind.”

As for where the bake sale proceeds will go, Lewis said the College Republicans are considering several charities.

But “because of all this controversy, we don’t want to advertise the organization,” he said. “We don’t want to cause them problems.”

 

 

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