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Quakebook Blog: A Twitter-sourced charity book about how the Japanese Earthquake affected us all.

QuakeBook cover raising money for Japan tsunami and earthquake victims JadeLuckClub http://JadeLuckClub.com Celebrating Asian American Creativity Posts by Japanese Quake Victims How to help Japan victims

QuakeBook cover raising money for Japan tsunami and earthquake victims JadeLuckClub http://JadeLuckClub.com Celebrating Asian American Creativity Posts by Japanese Quake Victims How to help Japan victims

Quakebook Blog is a Twitter-sourced charity book about how the Japanese Earthquake at 2:46 on March 11, 2011 affected us all with all proceeds benefiting the Japan Red Cross. You can sign up to be notified when the book is released here. The #quakebook (2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake) will be available very soon (within a few days) as an electronic download, and later, in a print edition.

Here are a few excerpts:

Daniel Freytag

Want

I have been around Tokyo for 15 years and I feel I am needed here now more than ever. The decision whether to stay is the most complex one I have ever had to make in my life. Japan is my adopted home. I would not leave a burning house alone if my family were still inside.

Our house is not as of yet on fire but I need to be available in the event it does go up in flames. We as a community don’t owe it to Japan. But when I think of the Fukushima 50 risking life and limb, when I think of the children now without parents in the Tohoku region, when I think about the untold damage to the region far beyond the scale of the New Orleans flooding, this is simply where I need to be.

It’s where I want to be.

DAN CASTELLANO
Tokyo

Care

I don’t know where to start to write . . . Ten days has passed since the earthquake. My parents’ house is within 40 km of the Fukushima nuclear plant. They’ve been told they must stay indoors. Although the house wasn’t greatly damaged by the earthquake or tsunami, as the house is built on solid ground, they have to contend with the problem of radiation.

Although this is far from the worst case of losing a family member or home, they have scarcely any information regarding radiation. All they can do is watch news on TV. They don’t know really if they are in danger or if they are safe, and fight against an invisible enemy inside the house. Even if they decide to evacuate, there have no gasoline, so they don’t know how far they would get. The trains aren’t running, either.

Linda Yuki Nakanishi


My 70-year-old mother refuses to go to a shelter and insists on staying at home. She says she’s not bothered by magnitude 3 earthquakes. Even though the government seems to have forgotten her, she is perfectly calm. What is the government doing? Don’t they care about the people in Fukushima? When people living towards the coast were confronted with the threat of radiation, the whole town decided to evacuate without waiting for government instructions. Nobody in my hometown will evacuate. Why? What’s more, they took in people evacuating from the town next-door, so now they feel they can’t evacuate themselves and leave those people behind.

People of the Tohoku region are stoic, compassionate, calm and humble. They have always just dealt with the situation without complaining. Of course they have questions and fears, but they hesitate to show them as they know other people are experiencing far worse

They don’t expect the government will help them, but they’ve made up their minds to stay here and fight. Rumors about radiation pollution continue to grow. What have we done to deserve this? We are suffering like others in disaster affected areas. The difference is we have an unnatural and unseen danger to deal with. Please don’t abandon Fukushima. Please see the reality. Please give us accurate and timely information. Please get this nightmare power station under control as soon as possible. And please know that Fukushima is doing its best

YUKI WATANABE
Tokyo (hometown Tamura, Fukushima)

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2 Responses to “Quakebook Blog: A Twitter-sourced charity book about how the Japanese Earthquake affected us all.”

  1. On April 6, 2011 at 9:16 am

    Steve Kapner

    responded with... #

    The book will be available soon as a download from Amazon. 100% of the proceeds will go to charity, Amazon is waiving all fees. I helped with this and it was incredible to see people from all over the world contribute. It wasn’t just writers, but anyone who had a skill pitched in–copy editors, illustrators, people with publishing experience, celebrities, reporters. And most of this came together in one week via social media.

    • On May 3, 2011 at 7:35 pm

      admin

      responded with... #

      To Steve,
      I would love to update that post with your contribution. Will you please send it to me? Thanks!

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