Asian in America, Don't ID as Asian for College

A Racist Bake Sale Exposes Reverse Discrimination against Asian Americans

John Stossel FoxNews.com Affirmative Action Racist Cupcake Sale JadeLuckClub Asian American Discrimination

Racist Cupcakes Bucknell Reverse Discrimination Asian Americans JadeLuckClubWhat do you think of this article on Affirmative Action? It kind of hits the nail on the head for me in terms of reverse discrimination for Asian Americans applying to top private colleges. I posted on this topic here and will continue to post a series of articles on this subject. The more I read about it and think about it, the angrier I become. How about you?

John Stossel FoxNews.com Affirmative Action Racist Cupcake Sale JadeLuckClub Asian American Discrimination

11/10/10

FoxNews.comGet Your Affirmative Action Cupcakes Here!
By John Stossel
This week, I held a bake sale — a racist bake sale. I stood in midtown Manhattan shouting, “Cupcakes for sale.” My price list read:
Asians — $1.50
Whites — $1.00
Blacks/Latinos — 50 cents
People stared. One yelled, “What is funny to you about people who are less privileged?” A black woman said, angrily, “It’s very offensive, very demeaning!” One black man accused me of poisoning the cupcakes.

I understand why people got angry. What I did was hurtful to some. My bake sale mimicked what some conservative college students did at Bucknell University. The students wanted to satirize their school’s affirmative action policy, which makes it easier for blacks and Hispanics to get admitted.

I think affirmative action is racism — and therefore wrong. If a private school like Bucknell wants to have such policies to increase diversity, fine. But government-imposed affirmative action is offensive. Equality before the law means government should treat citizens equally.

But it doesn’t. Our racist government says that any school receiving federal tax dollars, even if only in the form of federal aid to students, must comply with affirmative action rules, and some states have enacted their own policies.

Advocates of affirmative action argue it is needed because of historic discrimination. Maybe that was true in 1970, but it’s no longer true. Affirmative action is now part of the minority special privilege machine, an indispensable component of which is perpetual victimhood.

All the Bucknell students wanted was a campus discussion about that. Why not? A university is supposed to be a place for open discussion, but some topics are apparently off-limits. On my Fox Business show this week, I’ll discuss this with a member of the Bucknell Conservative Club who participated in the bake sale.

About an hour after the students began their “affirmative action” sale, the associate dean of students shut it down. He said it was because the prices charged were different from those listed on the permissions application. An offer to change the prices was rejected. Then the club’s application to hold another sale was rejected. Ironically, the associate dean said it would violate the schools nondiscrimination policy! He would authorize a debate on affirmative action, but nothing else.

How ridiculous! Fortunately, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) has come to the students’ defense: “Using this absurd logic, Bucknell would have to require its College Democrats to say nothing political on campus unless they give equal time to Republican candidates at their events, or its Catholic Campus Ministry to remain silent about abortion unless it holds a debate and invites pro-choice activists to speak,” FIRE’s Adam Kissel said. “While students are free to host debates, they must not be required to provide a platform for their ideological opponents. Rather, those opponents must be free to spread their own messages and host their own events.”

Right. My affirmative action cupcake “event” led to some interesting discussions. One young woman began by criticizing me, “It’s absolutely wrong.”But after I raised the parallel with college admissions, she said: “No race of people is worth more
than another. Or less.”

But do you believe in affirmative action in colleges? I asked.
“I used to,” she replied.

Those are the kind discussions students should have. Affirmative action wasn’t the only issue that brought conservative Bucknell students grief. When they tried to protest President Obama’s $787 billion “stimulus” spending last year by handing out fake dollar bills, the school stopped them for violating rules against soliciting! According to FIRE, Bucknell’s solicitation policy covers only sales and fundraising, which the students were not engaged
in, but the school rejected the students’ appeal, saying permission was needed to distribute “anything,from Bibles to other matter.”

Absurd! The Bucknell administration tells me it stopped the anti-stimulus protest because the students had not registered to use that busy campus space. FIRE disputes that.“Distributing protest literature is an American free-speech tradition that dates to before the founding of the United States,” Kissel said. “Why is Bucknell so afraid of students handing out ‘Bibles [or] other matter’ that might provide challenging perspectives? Colleges are supposed to be marketplaces of ideas, but Bucknell is betraying this ideal.”

It is, indeed. Why are America’s institutions of higher learning so fearful?
John Stossel is host of “Stossel” on the Fox Business Network.

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5 Responses to “A Racist Bake Sale Exposes Reverse Discrimination against Asian Americans”

  1. On July 12, 2011 at 10:57 am

    Boyie

    responded with... #

    Back at my undergrad alma mater, the Young Conservatives of Texas did this exact same thing in 2006, so John Stossel isn’t exactly original in that regard.

    But the results were still the same. People gawked. People were baffled. And don’t even let me get started when they did the ‘whites only’ scholarship.

  2. On July 15, 2011 at 12:19 pm

    Joe Yao

    responded with... #

    Quota systems are easy but wrong. They are also, technically, not affirmative action; but many colleges use them because they’re easier and each generation forgets.

    Offering different amounts of financial aid to different people is not wrong. However, if the criterion is solely race, that probably violates the anti-discrimination amendment. But I could never have afforded college were it not for the financial aid I got – probably greater then classmates like Bobby Kennedy Jr.

    Applications processes must be entirely color-blind. Where affirmative action comes in, is seeing whether there is an imbalance of qualified applicants as input to the process, and working to amend that. Going out and encouraging kids who think they could never afford college, telling them that [color-blind] financial aid even exists – THAT’S affirmative action. Going into the community and offering help to schools whose populations can’t afford the same level of extra help as other schools, or tutoring services, or what-not – THAT’S affirmative action.

    I would like to add that this is not solely the responsibility of colleges. We are all our brothers’ keepers [and sisters’, in case you don’t understand literary usages]. When we have large groups of the population in such poverty that the talents they do have are not developed, it makes the whole country poorer. And it cheers me every time I read of a lone person who decides out of the goodness of his or her heart to go out and help others in this way.

    Once the talents of all are developed and encouraged, and the input pool is leveled out, then frankly I don’t mind if a color-blind admissions process and a [mostly] need-based financial aid process at the theoretical school that might have such produce a student body that has more of one race than another. And not just because I’m a mixed-blood. Those would be the ones that qualify.

    • On July 15, 2011 at 2:46 pm

      admin

      responded with... #

      To Joe,
      From what I am learning, the application process is not color blind at all though I agree with you that it should be. I’m also with you that Affirmative Action should be more socio economic driven than a check box for race. An Asian who is third, fourth or more generation (and typically Chinese or Japanese or even Korean) is usually from a suburban, middle class assimilated background and in reality competes against East Asian first or second generation immigrants. Could these groups be more different yet be lumped together?!

  3. On August 11, 2011 at 4:01 pm

    Min Ko

    responded with... #

    We must stop this sale.

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  1. Thoroughly Modern Millie is Thoroughly Racist | Newton News,Reviews, Upcoming Events And Special Offers - October 12, 2015

    […] A Racist Bakesale Exposes Reverse Discrimination Against Asian Americans (I include this link because this is the real racist front that Asian Americans are currently fighting. All my posts on this topic are here. […]

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